Course1

Drafting Wills & Trust Documents to Reduce Risks of Challenge

$89.00

A last will and testament is not always the final word of a testator. Wills frequently trigger long-suppressed family rivalries and resentments. With the testator no longer on the scene, children or other heirs are freed to express their resentments. These resentments often worsen when the will’s plan for allocating of money, valuable property or sentimental items is made known, leading to dispute and litigation. These disputes can be very time-consuming and costly resolve, sharply diminishing the value of an estate. This program will discuss grounds for will contests and practical steps lawyers and their clients can take to avoid challenge. Spotting red flags in will contests – disinheriting close family members, unequal treatment of children, unusual behavior of testator & more Sources of law in will contests – grounds for challenging wills Practical steps to avoid will contests – will ceremonies, videotaped testaments, witness selection, affidavits Use of In Terrorem provisions to prevent will contests Issues surrounding holographic wills and other informal wills   Speaker: Steven B. Malech is partner in the New York City office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where he is chair of the firm’s probate litigation practice group.  He is represents beneficiaries, fiduciaries and creditors in disputes involving alleged violations of the Prudent Investor Act and its predecessors, alleged breaches of fiduciary duty, disputed accountings, and will contests. He represents clients in cutting edge probate litigation matters involving trusts and estates with assets in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Mr. Malech received his B.A., with special honors, from the University of Texas and his J.D. from the Connecticut School of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/23/2021
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Special Lease Issues for Medical/Dental Offices

$89.00

Leased Medical office space is now larger than industrial and nearly as large as retail leasing. These encompass primary medical and dental care practice, specialized surgical hospitals, long-term acute care facilities, community clinics, and health and wellness facilities.  All of these come with special leasing issues, including the creation and disposal of medical or hazardous waste, the installation of specialized equipment, additional regulatory compliance requirements associated with health care, and even patient privacy issues.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to special issues in drafting for medical and dental office space.  Types of medical properties and how leasing issues differ for each Medical offices in space not specifically designed for medical services Generation and disposal and medical and hazardous waste Accessibility issues and compliance with medical care regulations Landlord right of entry/patient privacy issues Installation of special medical/dental equipment and waiver of liens Special electricity needs and continuity of service Speakers:  John S. Hollyfield is of counsel and a former partner in the Houston office Norton Rose Fulbright, LLP.  He has more than 40 years’ experience in real estate law practice.  He formerly served as chair of the ABA Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section, president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, and chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute.  He has been named a "Texas Super Lawyer" in Real Estate Law by Texas Monthly magazine and is listed in Who’s Who in American Law.  He is co-editor of Modern Banking and Lending Forms (4th Edition), published by Warren, Gorham & Lamont.  He received his B.B.A. from the University of Texas and his LL.B. from the University of Texas School of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/23/2021
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Drafting Distribution Provisions in Trusts

$89.00

  Distribution provisions are the most essential provisions of trust instruments – and risk lurks everywhere.  If a trustee has unbounded discretion, he or she risks a “general power of appointment,” which would cause the trust’s assets to be taxable to the holder of the power of appointment.  But distribution standards – especially for “standard of living” or “emergencies” – are inherently susceptible to multiple interpretations and dispute, and potentially to litigation.  Ultimately, planning and drafting these provisions is an exercise in risk management and tradeoffs.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to planning and drafting distribution provisions in trust instruments, including the tradeoffs and risks. Risks of discretionary distributions – power of appointment, taxable inclusion, litigation Cost/benefit of heavily detailed v. general distribution provisions Ascertainable standards – health, education, maintenance, and support (HEMs) Drafting sole and absolute discretion, emergencies, best interests, and standard of living Role of fiduciary duties in making distribution decisions Tax considerations when making distributions   Speakers: Daniel L. Daniels is a partner in the Greenwich, Connecticut office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where his practice focuses on representing business owners, corporate executives and other wealthy individuals and their families.  A Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, he is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America,” and has been named by “Worth” magazine as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in the United States representing affluent individuals. Mr. Daniels is co-author of a monthly column in “Trusts and Estates” magazine.  Mr. Daniels received his A.B., summa cum laude, from Dartmouth College and received his J.D., with honors, from Harvard Law School.    

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/23/2021
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

"I Want Out!": Exit Rights in Business Agreements

$89.00

A client investment in an operating business, particularly a minority stake, is only as good as its liquidity.  If a client cannot readily sell his or her ownership stake at fair market value, it has little real value. The key to ensuring liquidity is contractually creating a private market for the ownership stake.  This market can come in the form of requiring other stakeholders, including the majority owner, to buy the minority stake at a mutually agreeable price, or creating other mechanisms for selling the stake to third parties. Without these contract rights, a stakeholder has no liquidity and is stuck. This program will provide you with a practical to planning and drafting contractual liquidity rights in closely held companies. Planning and drafting liquidity rights in closely held companies Counseling clients about the limitations and risks of liquidity in closely held companies Framework of alternatives for determining most appropriate liquidity rights “Texas standoff” or “Russian roulette” – opportunities, risks and tradeoffs Drafting “tag-along” and “drag-along” rights – practical uses and drawbacks How to think about valuing closely held ownership stakes   Speaker: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/23/2021
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Health Care Issues in Estate Planning

$89.00

Trust and estate planning for health care involves counseling clients about what are often the most difficult decisions in their life and drafting to implement those most sensitive decisions. There are issues of making life-and-death health care decisions many years in advance of when those decisions will be needed. There are equally delicate decisions about the appointment of trustees or conservators.Planning for long-term care – and how to fund that care – is often the biggest challenge for most clients.  If clients are not carefully counseled about their choices and their decisions not carefully reflected in trust and estate documents, their most important goals will be unfulfilled.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to the most important health care issues in trust and estate planning. Counseling clients about planning for health care decision-making Tension between health care providers & trustees – areas of competence, conflict, and cooperation Drafting advance health care directives & revocable trusts Defining objective health care “triggers” in documentation Key issues in appointing trustees, guardians & conservators Availability & financing of home health care & institutional care   Speakers: Missia H. Vaselaney is a partner in the Cleveland office of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister, LLP, where her practice focuses on estate planning for individuals and businesses.  She also represents clients before federal and state taxing authorities.  Ms. Vaselaney is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and has been a member of the Steering Committee for AICPA’s National Advanced Estate Planning Conference since 2001.  Ms. Vaselaney received her B.A. from the University of Dayton and her J.D. from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. Michael Sneeringer an attorney in the Naples, Florida office of Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP, where his practice focuses on trust and estate planning, probate administration, asset protection planning, and tax law. He has served as vice chair of the asset protection planning committee of the ABA’s Real Property, Trust and Estate Section and is an official reporter of the Heckerling Institute.  Mr. Sneeringer received his B.A. from Washington & Jefferson College, his J.D., cum laude, St. Thomas University School of Law, and his LL.M. from the University of Miami School of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/23/2021
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

2020 Uniform Commercial Code Update

$89.00

The overlapping articles of the UCC impact most business, commercial and real estate transactions.  From the perfection of security interests to the enforceability of promissory notes and investment contracts to equipment leases and the sale of goods, the UCC plays a role in most significant transactions. This program, led by one of the nation’s leading authorities on the UCC, will provide you with a wide-ranging discussion of developments under the many articles of the UCC, including secured transactions, investment notes, sales, and equipment leasing.   Recent UCC developments for transactional attorneys Developments impacting commercial, business and real estate transactions UCC Article 9, asset-based transactions and secured transactions Sales of goods contracts Equipment leases, including computer equipment and capital equipment Notes, guarantees and letters of credit   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/23/2021
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Ethics of Shared Law Offices, Working Remotely & Virtual Offices (5.17.19)

$89.00

Technology allows lawyers far more flexibility to practice law than ever before.  Lawyers can work in shared offices, splitting expenses with other small firms or solo practitioners. They can work remotely, from home or virtually anywhere, with basic computer and networking technology. But all these innovations come with potential ethics traps. These include issues of communications and confidentiality, supervising outsourced worked, multijurisdictional practice, and ethically managing all the technology used to practice law with this newfound flexibility.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to significant issues when lawyers and law firms share office space, work remotely, or establish “virtual” practices. Ethical issues when lawyers share office space or other resources but practice separately Disclosure to clients of virtual nature of law office Electronic communications, confidentiality, and ethical risks in virtual law offices How Web sites and a “virtual” presence implicate multijurisdictional practice issues Outsourcing work to paralegal services, including fee sharing issues  Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. H. Michael Drumm is the founder and member of Drumm Law, LLC in Denver, Colorado, where he has an extensive franchise, trademark and business transactional practice.  He works with franchisors across industries nationwide helping them draft, file and renew their franchise Disclosure Documents and franchise agreements.  He has a specialty representing craft breweries to help them trademark their brands and protect their intellectual property. He has been repeatedly honored by Franchise Times magazine as a “Legal Eagle” and has been designated by the International Franchise Association as a “Certified Franchise Executive.”  Mr. Drumm received his BSBA from the University of Missouri-Columbia and his J.D. from the University of Texas School of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/27/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Asset Protection Techniques for Real Estate

$89.00

Appreciated real estate is often the most valuable asset held by a client.  Real estate as an asset class is also frequently subject to depletion through divorce, claims of creditors, tort claimants and others.  Ensuring that the real estate is properly held, preserved, and administered to protect its value is the key task of many trust and estate plans. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to accessible asset protection strategies for real estate, including the sophisticated use of limited liability entities, trusts and insurance products, key elements of drafting operating agreements and their traps,and use of forms of ownership and choice of law planning.  Economic issues to consider on acquisition, holding and administration of real estate Sophisticated use of LLCs and trusts to protect real estate Key provisions of LLC operating agreements and their traps in protecting real estate Forms of ownership and choice of law as asset protection Uses and traps of using real estate products Bankruptcy planning opportunities and limitations for distressed real estate projects Speaker: Jonathan E. Gopman is a partner with Akerman, LLP in Naples, Florida and chair of the firm’s trust and estate group. His practice focuses on sophisticated wealth accumulation and preservation planning strategies for entrepreneurs.  He is a Fellow of the American College of Tax Counsel and co-author of the revised version of the BNA Tax Management Portfolio “Estate Tax Payments and Liabilities.”  He is also a commentator on asset protection planning matters for Leimberg Information Services, Inc., a member of the legal advisory board of Commonwealth Trust Company in Wilmington, Delaware, and a member of the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners. Mr. Gopman received his B.A. from the University of South Florida, his J.D. from Florida State University College of Law, and his LL.M. from the University of Miami.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/23/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Ethics in Negotiations – Boasts, Shading, and Impropriety (6.14.19)

$89.00

Lawyers must be truthful.  Yet they must be zealous in the representation of their clients.  The tension between these two principles is perhaps never as great as when the lawyer is negotiating for a client.  The negotiation may be a settlement of litigation or in connection with a transaction. The lawyer may make statements about the law or fact – or simply refrain from making statements because the lawyer knows certain facts or legal precedent are adverse to his or her client’s interest.   Lawyers may also “puff” or boast, signaling that a negotiating stance is firmer than a client’s true positon or more substantively valid than the law can reasonably support.  At some point, the gray ethical line is tripped and what the lawyer does becomes improper. This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethical issues in lawyer negotiations.  Ethics and ethical drawing lines – what’s an acceptable level of deception in negotiations? Affirmative statements of fact, value or intent in settlements Silence about adverse law in negotiations Silence about facts unknown to an opponent or counter-party Silence about errors in settlement agreements or transactional documents Non-litigation work in another state – “temporary” practice Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. Elizabeth Treubert Simon is an ethics attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, where she advises on a wide range of ethics and compliance-related matters to support Akin Gump’s offices worldwide.  Previously, she practiced law in Washington DC and New York, focusing on business and commercial litigation and providing counsel to clients regarding professional ethics and attorney disciplinary procedures.  She is a member of the New York State Bar Association Committee on Professional Discipline and the District of Columbia Legal Ethics Committee.  She writes and speaks extensively on attorney ethics issues.   She received her B.A. and M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania and her J.D. from Albany Law School.    

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/20/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Ethics of Joint Representations: Keeping Secrets & Telling Tales

$89.00

Joint representation in litigation is fraught with potential conflicts of interest among the jointly represented parties.  There are substantial issues related to decision-making, information flows, confidentiality, and loyalty.  Any of these issues, if not carefully explained to clients and documented in written waivers, may lead to dramatically adverse results for clients – and expose the lawyer to ethics complaints and potential discipline.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the substantial ethical issues in joint representations in litigation and how to navigate them. Forms of joint representations – separate representation on same matter v. joint representation on same matter Information flows under “keep secrets” and “no secrets” agreements Information flows in the absence of any agreement – what happens when there are no guardrails? Loyalty issues – managing inherent conflicts of interest and the use of advance waivers Voluntary and inadvertent creation of joint representations Attorney-client privilege ramifications in a later arising dispute among jointly represented clients   Speakers: Elizabeth Treubert Simon is an ethics attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, where she advises on a wide range of ethics and compliance-related matters to support Akin Gump’s offices worldwide.  Previously, she practiced law in Washington DC and New York, focusing on business and commercial litigation and providing counsel to clients regarding professional ethics and attorney disciplinary procedures.  She is a member of the New York State Bar Association Committee on Professional Discipline and the District of Columbia Legal Ethics Committee.  She writes and speaks extensively on attorney ethics issues.   She received her B.A. and M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania and her J.D. from Albany Law School. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/18/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Letters of Intent in Real Estate Transactions

$89.00

Letters of intent in real estate transactions – buying/selling property and leasing – are essential in helping the parties frame areas of agreement, identify areas for further negotiation, and establish a timeline for completing the deal.These letters can also be cost-effective in determining whether the parties can reach agreement on major terms before definitive agreements are drafted. But there are substantial drawbacks. One party may use the letter to shop the transaction to third parties, using the offer as a stalking horse. In some instances, too, the letter itself may be so detailed that it becomes enforceable. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting letters of intent in commercial real estate acquisition and sales, and leasing transactions. Defining timeframes for negotiations/operative agreements & expiration of letter Core economic terms – purchase price and holdbacks, lease payments, escalator clauses Deposits – hard money v. soft money – and escrow instructions Identifying the property subject to acquisition or lease Other major terms – use, exclusivity, environmental issues, etc. Confidentiality and non-marketing provisions   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School. Richard R. Goldberg is a retired partner, resident in the Philadelphia office of Ballard Spahr, LLP, where he established an extensive real estate practice, including development, financing, leasing, and acquisition.  Earlier in his career, he served as vice president and associate general counsel of The Rouse Company for 23 years.  He is past president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, past chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute, and past chair of the International Council of Shopping Centers Law Conference.  Mr. Goldberg is currently a Fellow of the American College of Mortgage Attorneys and is a member of the American Law Institute.  Mr. Goldberg received his B.A. from Pennsylvania State University and his LL.B. from the University of Maryland School of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/17/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Ethics & Artifcial Intelligence: What Lawyers Should Know

$89.00

The use of artificial intelligence is not some distant prospect.  Many of the tools lawyers use today – online research platforms that suggest other areas for research, software packages that help complete forms or propose or assemble language, and discovery tools that sort through documents – are driven by artificial intelligence. These and other AI engineered legal tools raise substantial ethical issues. Are they the unauthorized practice of law? Have lawyers researched their capabilities such that they are competent to use them? How must lawyers supervise their use by non-lawyer staff?  This program will provide you with a guide to ethics issues when using software and other technology tools based on AI in law practice. What duties do lawyers have to investigate and understand AI in the tools they use? Does AI constitute the unauthorized practice of law (UPL) in a state? Do software packages that draft language and assemble forms violate ethics rules? What supervisory and training obligations do lawyers have for non-lawyer staff using these tools? Are there ethics concerns of using AI in discovery? Must lawyers warn clients that they use AI?   Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/13/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Drafting LLC Operating Agreements, Part 2

$89.00

  LLC operating agreements may be the most commonly document drafted, reviewed and negotiated by transactional counsel. These documents define the governance, information and liquidation rights of members, allocate economic rewards, sometimes establish restrictions on members or their interests, and can assign or alleviate liability.  The tax provisions, too, are highly complex, defining allocations of tax attributes and rights to cash and property distributions.  Fiduciary duties may also be modified in a way that is not possible in other types of entities. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements. Day 1 – December 11, 2019: Drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements Planning for different types of capital contributions – capital v. services, current contributions v. future capital calls Management provisions depending on whether the LLC is member-managed v. manger-managed LLCs Fiduciary duties of members, modifications, and the “LLC opportunity doctrine” Restrictions on transfers of capital and profits interests Relationship between tax allocation and property distribution provisions, including IRC Section 704(b) accounting   Day 2 – December 12, 2019: Drafting allocation provisions for maximum tax benefit and to secure the safe harbor How “payments to member” (not distributions) are treated for financial v. tax purposes Drafting ordinary distributions, minimum tax distributions, waterfall distributions, liquidating distributions Rights of first refusal, rights of first offer, buy-sell provisions – understanding the alphabet soup of exit alternatives Liquidations of the entity and sale of an individual member’s interests   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.  

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/12/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Drafting LLC Operating Agreements, Part 1

$89.00

LLC operating agreements may be the most commonly document drafted, reviewed and negotiated by transactional counsel. These documents define the governance, information and liquidation rights of members, allocate economic rewards, sometimes establish restrictions on members or their interests, and can assign or alleviate liability.  The tax provisions, too, are highly complex, defining allocations of tax attributes and rights to cash and property distributions.  Fiduciary duties may also be modified in a way that is not possible in other types of entities. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements. Day 1 – December 11, 2019: Drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements Planning for different types of capital contributions – capital v. services, current contributions v. future capital calls Management provisions depending on whether the LLC is member-managed v. manger-managed LLCs Fiduciary duties of members, modifications, and the “LLC opportunity doctrine” Restrictions on transfers of capital and profits interests Relationship between tax allocation and property distribution provisions, including IRC Section 704(b) accounting   Day 2 – December 12, 2019: Drafting allocation provisions for maximum tax benefit and to secure the safe harbor How “payments to member” (not distributions) are treated for financial v. tax purposes Drafting ordinary distributions, minimum tax distributions, waterfall distributions, liquidating distributions Rights of first refusal, rights of first offer, buy-sell provisions – understanding the alphabet soup of exit alternatives Liquidations of the entity and sale of an individual member’s interests   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/11/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Trust & Estate Planning for Client Privacy in a Public World

$89.00

Trust and estate clients frequently want nothing more than their privacy. They want their holdings and plans kept secret, even fromtheir heirs.  Ensuring privacy is a multifaceted process that relies, in various parts, on substantive law but also on pragmatic steps.Privacy also turns on whether the client wants to protect the nature and extent of certain classes of assets, controversial or high profile holdings (for example, antique firearms or valuable objects of art), or something closer to home like the details of their own end-of-life health care plans or even death.  This program will provide you with a detailed guide to privacy in trust and estate planning. Utilizing revocable trusts – preventing disclosure of assets on death, facilitating anonymous ownership & ensuring plan secrecy Silent trusts as a method to limit disclosure to beneficiaries Titling of special assets including art, watercraft, firearms, and certain real estate Anonymity in charitable gift planning Financial planning privacy – investor privacy, lottery winner privacy, banking disclosure Medical privacy planning – HIPAA, insurance applications Securing third-party confidentiality through non-disclosure agreements Privacy at death – obituaries, last medical records, funeral arrangements   Speaker: Jeff Chadwick is a partner in the Houston and The Woodlands, Texas offices of Winstead, P.C, where his practice focuses on sophisticated trust and estate planning for closely held business owners, business executives, and other high net worth individuals and families. He provides practical advice on wealth transfer planning, business formation and structuring, asset protection planning, planned charitable giving, trust modifications, pre- and post-marital planning, and the administration of trusts and estates. Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Henry E. Hudson of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.  Mr. Chadwick earned his B.S., magna cum laude, from Baylor University and his J.D., summa cum laude, from the University of Richmond School of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/10/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Ethics and Conflicts with Clients, Part 2

$89.00

  Despite best efforts, lawyers may develop ethical conflicts with their clients.  Sometimes these conflicts may initially seem like positive developments. The lawyer may seek to buy into a client’s business enterprise or participate in a transaction, be offered a gift by a client, or even develop a romantic relationship with a client.  But these and many others come with substantial ethical issues.  Sometimes these conflicts may be more immediately problematic, as when a lawyer leaves a law firm and wants to take his or her clients to the new firm, or when a client refuses to pay legal fees, or worse, as when the lawyer has a duty to disclose certain acts of his or her own malpractice.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to lawyer conflicts with their clients and how to avoid or resolve them. Day 1 – December 5, 2019: Ethical issues when lawyers develop conflicts with their clients Gifts – can lawyers accept from clients? Business – can lawyers go into business with a client? Departure – can lawyers take their clients to a firm? Former clients – what duties does a lawyer have? Day 2 – December 6, 2019: Dishonest clients – what must you do? Lawyers as witnesses – how do you handle the conflict and privilege issues? Clients with diminished capacity – from whom do you take instructions?  What are the other issues? Settlements – what if a client’s tactics are improper? Malpractice – do you have a duty to disclose?   Speakers: William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.  

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/6/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Ethics and Conflicts with Clients, Part 1

$89.00

Despite best efforts, lawyers may develop ethical conflicts with their clients.  Sometimes these conflicts may initially seem like positive developments. The lawyer may seek to buy into a client’s business enterprise or participate in a transaction, be offered a gift by a client, or even develop a romantic relationship with a client.  But these and many others come with substantial ethical issues.  Sometimes these conflicts may be more immediately problematic, as when a lawyer leaves a law firm and wants to take his or her clients to the new firm, or when a client refuses to pay legal fees, or worse, as when the lawyer has a duty to disclose certain acts of his or her own malpractice.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to lawyer conflicts with their clients and how to avoid or resolve them. Day 1 – December 5, 2019: Ethical issues when lawyers develop conflicts with their clients Gifts – can lawyers accept from clients? Business – can lawyers go into business with a client? Departure – can lawyers take their clients to a firm? Former clients – what duties does a lawyer have? Day 2 – December 6, 2019: Dishonest clients – what must you do? Lawyers as witnesses – how do you handle the conflict and privilege issues? Clients with diminished capacity – from whom do you take instructions?  What are the other issues? Settlements – what if a client’s tactics are improper? Malpractice – do you have a duty to disclose?   Speakers: William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/5/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Business Torts: How Transactions Spawn Litigation, Part 2

$89.00

Business and commercial transactions are fraught with potential tort liability for attorneys and their clients. Whether out of disappointment at losing a deal or as a negotiating tactic or legitimate belief, counter-parties, competitors and third parties can easily allege tortious interference with existing or prospective business relationships.  There is also the risk of breaching the duty of good faith and fair dealing in transactions or misusing proprietary information obtained in negotiations in a failed deal. This program will you with a practical framework for understanding the range of business torts and real-world defenses.   Day 1 – December 3, 2019: Intentional interference with an existing contractual relationship – and the “business privilege” of competitors Interference with a prospective contract or transaction – what’s an “expectancy”? Fraudulent misrepresentations – how does an attorney spot “intent”? Negligent misrepresentation, including contributory negligence and the economic loss rule   Day 2 – December 4, 2019: Implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing – what it means for contract negotiations Contract terms involving discretion v. explicit terms Misdeeds by clients in contract negotiations Misappropriation of trade secrets disclosed in contract negotiations Usurpation of business opportunities and the organizational opportunity doctrine Torts in recruiting and hiring key employees away from competitors   Speakers: William J. Kelly, III is a founding member of Kelly & Walker LLCand has more than 25 years’ experience in the areas of employment and commercial litigation.  In the area of employment law, he litigates trade secret, non-compete, infringement and discrimination claims in federal and state courts nationwide and has advised Fortune 50 companies on workplace policies and practices.  In the area of commercial litigation, his experience includes class action litigation, breach of contract and indemnity, mass-claim complex insurance litigation, construction litigation and trade secrets.  Earlier in career, he founded 15 Minutes Music, an independent music production company.  Mr. Kelly earned his B.A. from Tulane University and his J.D. from St. Louis University School of Law. Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/4/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Business Torts: How Transactions Spawn Litigation, Part 1

$89.00

Business and commercial transactions are fraught with potential tort liability for attorneys and their clients. Whether out of disappointment at losing a deal or as a negotiating tactic or legitimate belief, counter-parties, competitors and third parties can easily allege tortious interference with existing or prospective business relationships.  There is also the risk of breaching the duty of good faith and fair dealing in transactions or misusing proprietary information obtained in negotiations in a failed deal. This program will you with a practical framework for understanding the range of business torts and real-world defenses.   Day 1 – December 3, 2019: Intentional interference with an existing contractual relationship – and the “business privilege” of competitors Interference with a prospective contract or transaction – what’s an “expectancy”? Fraudulent misrepresentations – how does an attorney spot “intent”? Negligent misrepresentation, including contributory negligence and the economic loss rule   Day 2 – December 4, 2019: Implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing – what it means for contract negotiations Contract terms involving discretion v. explicit terms Misdeeds by clients in contract negotiations Misappropriation of trade secrets disclosed in contract negotiations Usurpation of business opportunities and the organizational opportunity doctrine Torts in recruiting and hiring key employees away from competitors   Speakers: William J. Kelly, III is a founding member of Kelly & Walker LLCand has more than 25 years’ experience in the areas of employment and commercial litigation.  In the area of employment law, he litigates trade secret, non-compete, infringement and discrimination claims in federal and state courts nationwide and has advised Fortune 50 companies on workplace policies and practices.  In the area of commercial litigation, his experience includes class action litigation, breach of contract and indemnity, mass-claim complex insurance litigation, construction litigation and trade secrets.  Earlier in career, he founded 15 Minutes Music, an independent music production company.  Mr. Kelly earned his B.A. from Tulane University and his J.D. from St. Louis University School of Law.   Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 12/3/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

How to Use Trust Protectors in Client Plans

$89.00

The use of trust protectors and trust advisers are increasingly commonplace in in trust and estate planning. Trust protectors stand in the shoes of the trust settlor, ensuring that his or her wishes are fulfilled. Appointed the settlor, they are independent of trustees, potentially wielding substantial power over the trustee’s decisions, including adding or removing beneficiaries, making distributions, or even removing the trustee. The idea is the trust protector will have a global vision of the settlor’s wishes, judge trustee performance, and beneficiary needs. But these innovations come with administrative inefficiencies, additional costs, and complicated drafting. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning with and drafting the duties of trust protectors and trust advisers for client trusts.  Role, sources of authority, and duties of trust protectors Differences between trust protectors and trust advisers Relationship of trust protectors to trust settlor, trustees, and beneficiaries Powers of trust protectors – trustee removal, investment veto, trust termination, beneficiary modification, direct distributions Costs and administrative issues of trust protectors and trust advisers Statutory and common law forms of trust protectors   Speaker: Daniel L. Daniels is a partner in the Greenwich, Connecticut office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where his practice focuses on representing business owners, corporate executives and other wealthy individuals and their families.  A Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, he is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America,” and has been named by “Worth” magazine as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in the United States representing affluent individuals. Mr. Daniels is co-author of a monthly column in “Trusts and Estates” magazine.  Mr. Daniels received his A.B., summa cum laude, from Dartmouth College and received his J.D., with honors, from Harvard Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/27/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Drafting Property Management Agreements

$89.00

Commercial real estate as recurring source of income is only as good as it is managed.  Well managed properties not only provide stable income but also hold their underlying value, as the physical structure is well maintained, too. Management of commercial real estate is mostly outsourced to third parties. Management agreements vary widely according to the type of property managed – official, retail, multi-family, etc.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the types of property management agreements, varying fee arrangements, defining the scope of a manager’s duties, rent collection and operational controls, allocating risk and liability, and much more. Property management agreements for office and multi-family properties Defining scope of manager’s duties and responsibilities Understanding management fee alternatives Collection of rent and handling of funds Insurance, liability and indemnity issues for manager and property owner Operating decisions, controls, termination, and sale of property   Speaker: John S. Hollyfield is of counsel and a former partner in the Houston office Norton Rose Fulbright, LLP.  He has more than 40 years’ experience in real estate law practice.  He formerly served as chair of the ABA Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section, president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, and chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute.  He has been named a "Texas Super Lawyer" in Real Estate Law by Texas Monthly magazine and is listed in Who’s Who in American Law.  He is co-editor of Modern Banking and Lending Forms (4th Edition), published by Warren, Gorham & Lamont.  He received his B.B.A. from the University of Texas and his LL.B. from the University of Texas School of Law.  

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/26/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Lawyer Ethics When Storing Files in the Cloud

$89.00

  Most files are now stored in the “cloud,” a global network of servers that store files for organizations of every size, including law firms.  Many applications, including word processing, email and billing software packages that are used daily by lawyers and law firms, are also stored and used in the cloud.  This dramatic shift in the way files are created, modified, stored, and shared has substantial implications for law firms.   The first is a duty of competence requirement that lawyers understand how the technology they employ works and how it might impact client communications and confidentiality, among many other issues.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to ethical issues when lawyers and law firm store and create files in the cloud. Technology competence as an ethical duty of competence Ethical benchmarks and diligence for ensuring file and communication confidentiality in the cloud Mobile access – issues when the cloud is used via smartphone or tablet What if your client uses the cloud but you do not? Attorney-client privilege issues when using the cloud to communicate Internal policies – ensuring law firm security supplements cloud security   Speakers: Matthew Corbin is Senior Vice President and Executive Director in the Professional Services Group of AON Risk Services, where he consults with the company’s law firm clients on professional responsibility and liability issues.  Before joining AON, he was a partner with Lathrop & Gage, LLP, where he was a trial and appellate lawyer handling professional liability, commercial, business tort, employment, construction, insurance, and regulatory matters. Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Mary Briscoe of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.  Mr. Corbin earned his B.A. from the University of Kansas and his J.D. from the University of Kansas School of Law.    

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/22/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Planning for the Freeze: Trust & Estate Planning to ""Freeze"" Asset Values

$89.00

“Asset freezes” transfer future appreciation in a closely-held company or other asset from a senior generation to a junior generation, reducing the tax exposure of the senior generation and providing that any appreciation will be taxable at the generally lower rates of beneficiaries.  Asset freezes use a variety of trusts and techniques to achieve this shift in taxable appreciation.  Because freezes are subject to abuse, they are frequently challenged by the IRS.  If carefully planned, drafted, and administered, however, asset freeze platforms are effective tools for tax reduction while the senior generation still retains income from the asset.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the techniques,risks and opportunities of asset freezes. Use of retained interest trusts to shift asset appreciation – GRATs, GRITs, GRUTs Installment note sales of closely-held companies to heirs Use of self-cancelling installment notes and private annuities Qualified Personal Residence Trusts Income tax consequences of asset freezes   Speaker: Missia H. Vaselaney is a partner in the Cleveland office of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister, LLP, where her practice focuses on estate planning for individuals and businesses.  She also represents clients before federal and state taxing authorities.  Ms. Vaselaney is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and has been a member of the Steering Committee for AICPA’s National Advanced Estate Planning Conference since 2001.  Ms. Vaselaney received her B.A. from the University of Dayton and her J.D. from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. Michael Sneeringer an attorney in the Naples, Florida office of Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP, where his practice focuses on trust and estate planning, probate administration, asset protection planning, and tax law. He has served as vice chair of the asset protection planning committee of the ABA’s Real Property, Trust and Estate Section and is an official reporter of the Heckerling Institute.  Mr. Sneeringer received his B.A. from Washington & Jefferson College, his J.D., cum laude, St. Thomas University School of Law, and his LL.M. from the University of Miami School of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/21/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Private Placements: Raising Capital from Investors, Part 2

$89.00

Closely held companies raise capital through private placements, an offering of stock or other securities to private investors. Offerings of every size must comply with a dense set of federal securities regulation that require the offering of securities to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission or qualify for an exemption from registration, mostly commonly Regulation D.  Failure to understand the regulatory framework and draft private placement documents exposes the offering company to substantial financial liability. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning private placements, drafting the operative agreements, and understanding the regulatory framework governing them. Day 1 – November 19, 2019: How private placements are used as a practical matter in capital raises Understanding the securities law and regulatory framework of private placements Reliance on Reg. D safe harbor to avoid registration – amounts raised, accredited investor, timeframes, non-solicitation Understanding exempt securities v. exempt offerings   Day 2 – November20, 2019: Practical guidance on drafting subscription agreements Understanding disclosures in offering documents and liability for issuer of securities Special issues for small private placements Crowdfunding as a capital raising tool   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Mr. Terry earned his A.B. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Wayne State University.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/20/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Private Placements: Raising Capital from Investors, Part 1

$89.00

Closely held companies raise capital through private placements, an offering of stock or other securities to private investors. Offerings of every size must comply with a dense set of federal securities regulation that require the offering of securities to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission or qualify for an exemption from registration, mostly commonly Regulation D.  Failure to understand the regulatory framework and draft private placement documents exposes the offering company to substantial financial liability. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning private placements, drafting the operative agreements, and understanding the regulatory framework governing them. Day 1 – November 19, 2019: How private placements are used as a practical matter in capital raises Understanding the securities law and regulatory framework of private placements Reliance on Reg. D safe harbor to avoid registration – amounts raised, accredited investor, timeframes, non-solicitation Understanding exempt securities v. exempt offerings   Day 2 – November20, 2019: Practical guidance on drafting subscription agreements Understanding disclosures in offering documents and liability for issuer of securities Special issues for small private placements Crowdfunding as a capital raising tool   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Mr. Terry earned his A.B. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Wayne State University.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/19/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Ethics for Transactional Lawyers

$89.00

Representing a client in a business, commercial or real estate transaction can get ethically complicated very quickly.  There is the question of who you represent.  In a closely held company, with multiple shareholders or members, this can be problematic if the officer or manager from whom you are taking instructions thinks you represent that person and not the entity.  The client may offer you the opportunity to buy into a transaction, which puts your role as lawyer in tension with your role as investor.  There are also substantial ethical issues involved in negotiations and whether a party on the other side of the transaction is represented by legal counsel or not. This program will provide you with a real world guide to the ethics of representing clients in business, commercial, and legal transactions. Ethics of representing clients in transactions Representation – who is your client? The company’s board or its owners? Do they know that? Counter-parties – how do you negotiate on behalf of your client with unrepresented parties? Business with clients – can you buy into (or be given) a stake in a client’s business or a transaction? Serving on a client’s board of directors – how do you separate your legal role from your fiduciary obligation? Negotiations – how do ethics rules limit your flexibility to negotiate?   Speakers: William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/15/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Offices Leases: Current Trends & Most Highly Negotiated Provisions

$89.00

Leases for office spacehave their own logic, economics, and traps.  Next to customary issues of the allocation and payment of operating expenses, there are issues of building services, including access to high-speed data and telecommunication networks.  Many tenants are also motivated by energy efficiency and the environmental sustainability of their space.  If the space is occupied by medical or dental practice, the landlord needs to be concerned about waste disposal and other environmental issues.  Throughout an office lease there are traps for the unwary. This program will provide you a detailed guide to reviewing and drafting office leases, including building services, operating expenses, and expanding or contracting space. Economics of office leases – and protecting landlord margins Building services – telecom and data bandwidth issues Operating expenses – taxes, insurance, fees and penalties Special issues for medical and dental practices Make-ups and give-backs – strategies for tenants and practical responses of landlords Assignment and subletting – consent of landlord, other issues Liability issues – insurance and indemnity, waiver of subrogation, waiver of right to sue   Speakers: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/14/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Structuring Minority Ownership Stakes in Companies

$89.00

Taking a minority ownership stake in a closely held company is a common occurrence. An investor may have taken a minority stake to fund growth in the business or someone may have provided essential, non-cash services – technical expertise, sales skill, management expertise – in exchange for equity. But there are substantial drawbacks with minority stakes. The minority stake holder may have limited access to information to the business and little or no control or influence over the ultimate success of the business.  The majority stake holder(s) may also seek to force out minority stake holders. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to structuring minority stake investments in anticipation of the majority stake owner eventually forcing the buyout of minority stake owners. Structuring minority stake ownership for eventual buyout by the majority stake owner How to avoid undue dispute and litigation through planning Framework of law protecting minority stake owners Equitable structuring of minority stake governance, information, and other rights Differences between passive minority-stake owner and those who actively participate in the business Valuation and buyout finance issues for majority stake owners Liquidity rights for minority stake owners Counseling techniques to help avoid open dispute among owners   Speaker: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Molly Merritts is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she focuses her practice on a wide range of corporate law matters, including mergers and acquisitions, debt and equity financing, and real estate investment trusts. She also advises clients on corporate governance matters, transactional and commercial contract negotiations, and corporate reorganizations.  Ms. Merritt earned her B.S. from the University of Maryland, and her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/12/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Ethics of Identifying Your Client: It's Not Always Easy

$89.00

The first step in every ethics analysis is answering the question, who is your client?  It’s seemingly a very easy question to answer, but it’s not always 20/20 except in hindsight.  Representing multiple parties on the same matter, whether in litigation or on a transaction, may mean you have many clients, some or all with conflicts.  If you’re a private practitioner and you represent an organization, your client may be the entity, its officers from whom you are taking directions, or possibly both. If you’re an in-house attorney, the analysis – and its implications for the attorney-client privilege – becomes even more complex. This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethics of identifying your client in a variety of settings avoiding conflicts of interest with the client. Ethics and identifying your client and avoiding conflicts in transactions and litigation Representing businesses entities, nonprofit associations, and the government – client v. person giving directions Identifying clients in trust and estate planning – the testator or the person paying your fees? Special ethical challenges and ethical risks for in-house counsel and attorney-client privilege issues How to untangle clients and conflicts in joint representations – managing conflicts and information flows Best practices in documenting client representation to avoid later challenge   Speakers: Elizabeth Treubert Simon is an ethics attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, where she advises on a wide range of ethics and compliance-related matters to support Akin Gump’s offices worldwide.  Previously, she practiced law in Washington DC and New York, focusing on business and commercial litigation and providing counsel to clients regarding professional ethics and attorney disciplinary procedures.  She is a member of the New York State Bar Association Committee on Professional Discipline and the District of Columbia Legal Ethics Committee.  She writes and speaks extensively on attorney ethics issues.   She received her B.A. and M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania and her J.D. from Albany Law School. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/8/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Buying and Selling Commercial Real Estate: A Practical Guide, Part 2

$89.00

Buying and selling commercial real estate is a lengthy and complex undertaking from diligence and letters of intent to mortgage agreements and, ultimately, the underlying purchase and sale agreement.  Although all sectors of commercial real estate, with the exception of retail space, are strong, lenders are still cautious.  Reps and warranties have become more extensive and exacting in detail. Financing contingencies have become lengthy and complex. Due diligence has become lengthier, more invasive and costlier – or barely permitted at all, in particularly “hot” markets.  Managing all these elements is demanding.  This program will provide you a practical guide to the transactional cycle of buying and selling commercial real estate. Day 1 – November 6, 2019: Planning the process – letters of intent, negotiations, closing process Due diligence depending on the type of deal – title, environmental, finance issu Understanding the minefield of seller’s reps and warranties Buyer and seller’s covenants in a volatile market Deposits of money Day 2 – November 7, 2019: Issues for income producing properties, multiple family properties, and distressed properties Finance issues in operative agreements, including finance contingencies, and working with commercial lenders Conditions to closing and reducing the risk of not closing Post-closing issues, baskets, escrow and contingencies Bankruptcy issues in operative agreements   Speakers: John S. Hollyfield is of counsel and a former partner in the Houston office Norton Rose Fulbright, LLP.  He has more than 40 years’ experience in real estate law practice.  He formerly served as chair of the ABA Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section, president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, and chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute.  He has been named a "Texas Super Lawyer" in Real Estate Law by Texas Monthly magazine and is listed in Who’s Who in American Law.  He is co-editor of Modern Banking and Lending Forms (4th Edition), published by Warren, Gorham & Lamont.  He received his B.B.A. from the University of Texas and his LL.B. from the University of Texas School of Law. Richard R. Goldberg is a retired partner, resident in the Philadelphia office of Ballard Spahr, LLP, where he established an extensive real estate practice, including development, financing, leasing, and acquisition.  Earlier in his career, he served as vice president and associate general counsel of The Rouse Company for 23 years.  He is past president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, past chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute, and past chair of the International Council of Shopping Centers Law Conference.  Mr. Goldberg is currently a Fellow of the American College of Mortgage Attorneys and is a member of the American Law Institute.  Mr. Goldberg received his B.A. from Pennsylvania State University and his LL.B. from the University of Maryland School of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 11/7/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE